Sunday, June 15, 2008

kosher gelatin from BEEF... ALLOWEd with MILK!!

Meat and Milk cannot be mixed according to Kosher rules?? THINK AGAIN!!..

With such important needs to be met, several companies have recently developed Kosher gelatins that meet the rigorous requirements of virtually all authorities. One company has developed a product called Kolatin� - a beef gelatin made from Glatt Kosher beef hides, which was the process that was originally approved for Kosher gelatin production forty years ago.

The only Halachik concern with such a product would be its Pareve status, an issue that was indeed dealt with at that time. Rav Moshe Feinstein ruled that clean hides from Kosher animals are not considered meat as regards the rules of Basar B'Chalav M'Doraissa (on a Biblical level). Therefore, if they are processed in such a way as to render them essentially tasteless - as is the case with gelatin - the product is considered Pareve. Rav Aharon Kotler, while disagreeing with this concept, nevertheless allowed its use in milk where it constitutes less than 1/60 of the product (similar to the Halacha of using Kosher animal rennet to make cheese). The Bais Din of the Agudas Yisroel in Yerushalayim also ruled that such material would be considered Pareve. The only practical problem with the product is that its production is tedious and therefore more costly than conventional gelatin. First, only part of the production in a Kosher slaughterhouse is indeed Kosher - some animals are Treifa (having damaged internal organs) and others are not slaughtered properly (Neveila), both of which are not Kosher. As such, hides from Glatt Kosher animals must be monitored and segregated for gelatin production. Second, the hides must be soaked and salted ("Kashered") to remove blood, just as all Kosher meat is processed. Third, the hides used in conventional gelatin production are generally the trimmings and other by-products of the leather industry, which can be purchased at heavy discounts; Kosher hides are prime material and must be purchased at full price. Fourth, the equipment used to produce Kosher gelatin must be completely Kashered from their normal non-Kosher production, a time-consuming and expensive process. In addition, the entire process must be supervised. Nevertheless, Kolatin is used to make true gelatin deserts and real marshmallows, both of which are available with a reliable Kosher certification under the Elyon label.


Source: www.kashrut.com


Libellula & Cissy, I may be able to help.

Torah does prohibit cooking meat with milk, but does not prohibit eating cooked meat with milk.
That was a hedge to protect us from failing Torah.

So beef products mixed with milk products CAN be kosher, if prepaired right.

Source: www.veggieboards.com

1 comment:

Anonymous said...

>>Libellula & Cissy, I may be able to help.

Torah does prohibit cooking meat with milk, but does not prohibit eating cooked meat with milk.
That was a hedge to protect us from failing Torah.<<

I don't understand what you are getting at exactly, but kosher laws do NOT approve eating meat of any kind with milk, cooked or not. Yes, the Torah specifically prohibited cooking an animal's meat in its mother's milk, and the laws of kashruth evolved the concept further to the present day prohibition of all meat and milk not to be eaten together. If this is what you mean then you are correct.

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